99) A Man Who Talked Too Much

A Jewish Fable by Shoshannah Brombacher < http://www.chabad.org >

     In a small town somewhere in Eastern Europe lived a nice man with a nasty problem: he talked too much about other people.  He could not help himself.  Whenever he heard a story about somebody he knew, and sometimes about somebody he did not know, he just had to tell it to his friends.  Since he was in business, he heard quite a lot of rumors and stories.  He loved the attention he got, and was delighted when they laughed because of the way he told his stories, which he sometimes embellished with little details he invented to make them funnier and juicier.  Other than that, he was really a pleasant, goodhearted man.

     He knew it was wrong, but… it was too tempting; and in any case, most of what he told had really happened, didn’t it?  Many of his stories were just innocent and entertaining, weren’t they?

     One day he found out something really weird (but true) about another businessman in town.  Of course he felt compelled to share what he knew with his colleagues, who told it to their friends, who told it to people they knew, who told it to their wives, who spoke with their friends and their neighbors.  It went around town, till the unhappy businessman who was the main character in the story heard it.  He ran to the rabbi of the town, and wailed and complained that he was ruined!  Nobody would like to deal with him after this.  His good name and his reputation were gone with the wind.

     Now this rabbi knew his customers, so to speak, and he decided to summon the man who loved to tell stories.  If he was not the one who started them, he might at least know who did.

     When the nice man with the nasty problem heard from the rabbi how devastated his colleague was, he felt truly sorry.  He honestly had not considered it such a big deal to tell this story, because it was true; the rabbi could check it out if he wanted.  The rabbi sighed.

     “True, not true, that really makes no difference!  You just cannot tell stories about people.  This is all slander, and it’s like murder– you kill a person’s reputation.”  He said a lot more, and the man who started the rumor now felt really bad and sorry.  “What can I do to make it undone?” he sobbed.  “I will do anything you say!”

     The rabbi looked at him.  “Do you have any feather pillows in your house?”  

     “Rabbi, I am not poor; I have a whole bunch of them.  But what do you want me to do, sell them?”

     “No, just bring me one.”

     The man was mystified, but he returned a bit later to the rabbi’s study with a nice fluffy pillow under his arm.  The rabbi opened the window and handed him a knife.  “Cut it open!”

     “But Rabbi, here in your study?  It will make a mess!”

     “Do as I say!”

     And the man cut the pillow.  A cloud of feathers came out.  They landed on the chairs and on the bookcase, on the clock, on the cat which jumped after them.  They floated over the table and into the teacups, on the rabbi and on the man with the knife, and a lot of them flew out of the window in a big swirling, whirling trail.

     The rabbi waited ten minutes.  Then he ordered the man:  “Now bring me back all the feathers, and stuff them back in your pillow.   All of them, mind you.  Not one may be missing!”

     The man stared at the rabbi in disbelief.  “That is impossible, Rabbi.  The ones here is the room I might get, most of them, but the ones that flew out of the window are gone.  Rabbi, I can’t do that, you know it!”

     “Yes,” said the rabbi and nodded gravely, “that is how it is:  once a rumor, a gossipy story, a ‘secret,’ leaves your mouth, you do not know where it ends up.  It flies on the wings of the wind, and you can never get it back!”

     He ordered the man to deeply apologize to the person about whom he had spread the rumor.  That is difficult and painful, but it was the least he could do.  He ordered him to apologize to the people to whom he had told the story, making them accomplices in the nasty game, and he ordered him to diligently study the laws concerning gossip and slander every day for a year, and then come back to him.

     That is what the man did.  And not only did he study about gossip, he talked about the importance of guarding your tongue to all his friends and colleagues.  And in the end he became a nice man who overcame a nasty problem.

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Exodus 20:16 (the 8th commandment)  —  You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.

Proverbs 12:18  —  The words of the reckless pierce like swords, but the tongue of the wise brings healing.

James 1:26  —  Those who consider themselves religious and yet do not keep a tight rein on their tongues deceive themselves, and their religion is worthless.

James 3:7-10  —  All kinds of animals, birds, reptiles and sea creatures are being tamed and have been tamed by mankind, but no human being can tame the tongue.  It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison.  With the tongue we praise our Lord and Father, and with it we curse human beings, who have been made in God’s likeness.  Out of the same mouth come praise and cursing.  My brothers and sisters, this should not be. 

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A PRAYER BY MARTIN LUTHER ON THE 8TH COMMANDMENT:  

I confess and ask for your grace, because I have so often in my life sinfully spoke with malice and contempt against other people.  They depend on me for their honor and reputation, just as I depend on them for the same.  Help us all to obey this commandment, giving our neighbor the benefit of the doubt, and explaining their actions in the kindest way.  Amen.

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The Gossips, Norman Rockwell, 1948

The gossips - Norman Rockwell